Datasheet

Here you can find the online datasheet and user manual of SOLO, containing the main electrical and mechanical characteristics of SOLO, plus the basics of wiring and how to control it in different modes like Analogue mode using analogue voltages or PWM techniques as well as the digital control and how to communicate with SOLO using UART, USB and CAN protocols, sending commands and receiving feedbacks from SOLO.

Power Specifications

Datasheet 1

Control Specifications

Control Specifications

Absolute Maximum Voltage Ratings

The sections are referred to below interactional sections IMG1

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The +3.3V parts are NOT +5V tolerant, and in case of applying more than 3.3V, the device might get permanently Damaged.

The users should refer to “Typical Max” for the maximum voltage allowed on each pin, the “Absolute Max” is just for very short times considering the effect of spikes and fast harmonics.

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The “DIR” is a 3.3V input, and it’s NOT 5v tolerant, to apply a 5V input you MUST use a resistor with a value between 1kΩ to 2.2kΩ, as can be seen in “Essential Wiring Example” below (The exact value of resistance is not important, but it must be in mentioned range).

pin_solo

SOLO’s Interactional Sections

The most important parts of SOLO for the users to interact are as below divided into 12 parts.

Datasheet 2

1. Motor Output

This connector of SOLO should be connected to the Motors wires. You can find out more about how to connect them by looking at the “Minimum Required Wirings” part, but in general for 3 phase motors the A,B,C pins should get connected to the 3 phase wires of the motor and for DC brushed motors only B and C pins are required to be connected to the motor.

Datasheet 3

2. Supply Input

This is the Power Supply input of SOLO and you can power it up with any input voltages from 8 to 56 volts in continuous mode, depending on the voltage rating of the Motor Connected at the output. The max rating for supply input is 58V in transient mode, meaning that SOLO will go into over-voltage protection mode in case the supply or BUS voltage rises above almost 58 volts.

Supply Input

3. Analogue Inputs and +5V External Supply

4 & 5. Speed Controller Kp and Ki

These are two potentiometers, defining the speed controller gains in closed-loop mode, You can increase their values by rotating them in Counter ClockWise direction, subsequently by rotating them in Clockwise direction their value reduces until they get blocked in that direction which means a value of ZERO, their simple definitions can be given as following :

Kp : defines for you how fast your motor should react and reach the speed you asked, so if you increase this value, your motor will be more reactive, but too much of this gain might make vibrations, so you need to tune it enough. Also another effect of this gain will be how “harshly” the controller ( here SOLO ) should react to the variation of the load on the shaft of the motor to keep the speed constant. It’s not always good to increase this gain randomly, since it might cause instability and it totally depends on your system.

Ki: defines how good your motor during time should reach the goal, so by increasing this value your motor might reach the goal slower but more consistent. Also by increasing this gain too much your motor might get unstable. So you need to tune this similar to Kp with patience and accuracy.

Speed Controller Gains

6. Piano Switch

7. Micro USB 2

This is the micro_USB 2 connector of SOLO which is used for upgrading the firmware as well as sending and receiving digital packets and commands, in Commanding mode, this USB will turn into a COM port capable of putting SOLO into digital control and functioning in standalone mode with only 1 USB cable and the Motor connected at the output.

 

 

Usb

 

 

8. Encoder/Hall Input

9. Communication Port

10. Status LED

This is the status LED indicator, after the device startup, in case of having a safe boot up with no errors like over-current, over voltage and etc, it will start blinking, this means everything is fine and you are ready to go.

11. Errors LED

This is the Error indicator, and in case of an error, it will act as below:
– Over voltage Error: Starts Blinking
– Over Current Error: Stays ON
– Over Temperature Error: Stays ON

12. Power Up LED

There is a simple LED here named “A1” which just indicates if SOLO has been powered up correctly or not. So when it’s ON, it means you have correctly connected the input Supply terminals of SOLO to Positive and Negative of your power supply or battery. If you put SOLO into reverse polarity connection, this LED will remain OFF.

Mechanical Dimensions

Datasheet 8

– All the measurements are in millimeters
– Download 3D model from Here.

Minimum Required Wirings

The minimum wirings required to run SOLO in different configurations depending on the type of the electrical motor connected are as below

Brushless Motors: Closed-loop Mode

Close loop mode bruchless

Brushless or ACIM Motors: Open-loop Mode

open loop bruchless and ACIM

DC brushed Motors: Closed-loop Mode

Closed loop DC brushed

DC brushed Motors: Open-loop Mode

Open loop DC brushed

AC induction Motors: Closed-loop Mode

Datasheet 9

In sensorless or open-loop mode, the order of the connection of Motor wires to A,B,C output is not important and it will only affect the Direction of rotation which you can set using “DIR” input.

Standalone Wiring Example (No External Modules)

Here you can see an example of how to wire SOLO without having any external modules or special settings, just by using a couple of potentiometers and a switch. In this example you can see a wiring of a Brushless Motor in Closed-Loop Mode with Current Limit all done using only two potentiometers. Please Not that:

– The current Limit Potentiometer is not mandatory to use, and if you leave the “P/F” input open, the current Limit will be automatically set at 32A. This input in closed-loop mode acts as if the voltage applied to this pin is 5V, it will stop the current floating to the motor( current Limit at zero), and if this pin is left open it will allow up to 32A floating into your Motor, so any value between these will define the value of current limit. For example if you are applying analogue voltages to this pin you can use the following formula to know the value of current Limit:

The current Limit value = ((5.0 – Analogue Voltage applied at P/F input)/5.0) * 32

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– The “DIR” pin is connected/disconnected To/From the Ground to alter the direction of rotation of your Motor from C.W to C.C.W or reverse. Please notice that the high voltage level for this pin is 3.3V and it’s NOT 5V tolerant, if you like to connect the “DIR” to a 5V input, you MUST use a resistor valued from 1kΩ to 2.2kΩ (only for this pin, the exact value is not important, but it must be in this range), as can be seen in “Essential Wiring Example” in next parts.

Standalone wiring example

Essential Wiring Example (SOLO + Arduino Uno)

Here is an example of wiring SOLO with an Arduino uno, as can be seen:
1- Arduino has been directly powered up by SOLO, This is only allowed when the only power source of Arduino is SOLO, so Arduino should not be powered up both by PC or the DC plug as well as SOLO which might cause damage to Arduino ( since it accepts only one source of Power), if you want to power up Arduino or any other modules separately, just don’t use the +5V of SOLO, and make sure the GND pin of SOLO has been connected to the GND of your Arduino or other modules at a single point at least.

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2- The “DIR” pin of SOLO has been connected to Aruduino with a resistor in between, since the Arduino voltage level is between 0 to 5V, but “DIR” pin on SOLO is a 3.3V input and it’s not 5V tolerant, so to use 5V commands, you must put a resistor in between with a value from 1kΩ to 2.2kΩ. (only for “DIR” pin you can use a resistor to lower the voltage level because it has some internal circuits for that, but, for other 3.3V inputs like UART_TX, UART_RX, … you must directly give a 3.3V leveled signal)

Essential arduino wiring

Fast Track Tips

below you can find some fast track tips for setting up SOLO and putting it into work immediately

Fast-track Tips No.1: Control the Speed of your Brushless motor in closed-loop sensorless mode

0) Turn off SOLO
1) Make sure all the piano switches of SOLO are in Up position
2) Turn potentiometers “Kp”, and “Ki” in clockwise direction all the way back until they get blocked
3) Apply the stand alone required wirings (mentioned before)
4) Select the Motor type using Piano Switch by putting Pin 1 Down and Pin 2 Up to select Normal Brushless Motor
5) Turn On SOLO
6) Put SOLO into Closed-loop mode by pushing piano switch number 5 Down, you should see a little vibration in the motor for a second
7) Put SOLO into Speed control Mode by pushing the piano switch number 4 in Down position
8) Tune the Kp and Ki potentiometers, rotate around 5 degrees the Kp and 1 degree the Ki in Counter clockwise direction
9) Increase the voltage on “S/T” pin by rotating Speed/Torque potentiometer to increase or decrease the Speed of your Motor
10) You can limit the current by increasing the voltage at “P/F” input using current Limit potentiometer, the higher the voltage at “P/F” the lower will be the current, the value of current limit can be calculated from: The current Limit value = ((5.0 – Analogue Voltage applied at P/F input)/5.0) * 32

Fast-track Tips No. 2: Control the Torque of your Brushless motor in closed-loop sensorless mode

0) Turn off SOLO
1) make sure all the piano switches of SOLO are in Up position
2) Apply the stand alone required wirings (mentioned before)
3) Select the Motor type using Piano Switch by putting Pin 1 Down and Pin 2 Up to select a Normal Brushless Motor
4) Turn On SOLO
5) Put SOLO into Closed-loop mode by pushing piano switch number 5 Down, you should see a little vibration in the motor for a second
6) Put SOLO into Torque control Mode by leaving the piano switch number 4 in Up position
7) Increase the voltage on “S/T” pin by rotating Speed/Torque potentiometer to increase or decrease the Torque of your Motor
8) You can limit the current by increasing the voltage at “P/F” input using current Limit potentiometer, the higher the voltage at “P/F” the lower will be the current, the value of current limit can be calculated from: The current Limit value = ((5.0 – Analogue Voltage applied at P/F input)/5.0) * 32

Fast-track Tips No. 3: Control the Speed of your DC motor in closed-loop sensorless mode

0) Turn off SOLO
1) Make sure all the piano switches of SOLO are in Up position
2) Turn potentiometers “Kp”, and “Ki” in clockwise direction all the way back until they get blocked
2) Apply the stand alone required wirings (mentioned before), by only connecting your DC motor wires to outputs “B” and “C” of SOLO.
3) Select the Motor type using Piano Switch by putting Pin 1 and Pin 2 Down to select DC Brushed Motor
4) Turn On SOLO
5) Put SOLO into Closed-loop mode by pushing piano switch number 5 Down, you should see a little vibration in the motor for less than a second
6) Put SOLO into Speed control Mode by pushing the piano switch number 4 in Down position
7) Tune the Kp and Ki potentiometers, rotate like 5 degrees the Kp and 1 degree the Ki in Counter clockwise direction
8) Increase the voltage on “S/T” pin by rotating Speed/Torque potentiometer to increase or decrease the speed of your Motor
9) You can limit the current by increasing the voltage at “P/F” input using current Limit potentiometer, the higher the voltage at “P/F” the lower will be the current, the value of current limit can be calculated from: The current Limit value = ((5.0 – Analogue Voltage applied at P/F input)/5.0) * 32